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Nanosensors support skin cancer therapy

Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer. In more than 50 percent of affected patients a particular mutation plays an important role. As the life span of the patients carrying the mutation can be significantly extended by novel drugs, it is very important to identify those reliably. For identification, researchers from the University of Basel and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in Lausanne have developed a novel nanosensor method.

Posted: Feb 14th, 2013

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A quantum dot energy harvester

A new type of nanoscale engine has been proposed that would use quantum dots to generate electricity from waste heat, potentially making microcircuits more efficient.

Posted: Feb 14th, 2013

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MRI for the nanoscale

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reveals details of living tissues, diseased organs and tumors inside the body without x-rays or surgery. What if the same technology could peer down to the level of atoms?

Posted: Feb 13th, 2013

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Light-emitting bioprobe fits in a single cell

Stanford study is the first to demonstrate that sophisticated, engineered light resonators can be inserted inside cells without damaging the host. The researchers say it marks a new age in which tiny lasers and light-emitting diodes yield new avenues in the study and influence of living cells.

Posted: Feb 13th, 2013

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Sustainable new catalysts fueled by a single proton

Chemists at Boston College have designed a new class of catalysts triggered by the charge of a single proton. The simple organic molecules offer a sustainable and highly efficient platform for chemical reactions that produce sets of molecules crucial to advances in medicine and the life sciences.

Posted: Feb 13th, 2013

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Origami meets chemistry in scholarly nanotechnology video-article

Chemical engineers at Johns Hopkins University have developed self-assembling particles that are inspired by origami, the traditional Japanese art of folding paper into complex three-dimensional shapes. A new article demonstrates the fabrication and folding of these particles.

Posted: Feb 13th, 2013

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Time reversal findings may open doors to the future

Imagine a cell phone charger that recharges your phone remotely without even knowing where it is; a device that targets and destroys tumors, wherever they are in the body; or a security field that can disable electronics, even a listening device hiding in a prosthetic toe, without knowing where it is. While these applications remain only dreams, researchers at the University of Maryland have come up with a sci-fi seeming technology that one day could make them real.

Posted: Feb 13th, 2013

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Engineers show feasibility of superfast materials

University of Utah engineers demonstrated it is feasible to build the first organic materials that conduct electricity on their edges, but act as an insulator inside. These materials, called organic topological insulators, could shuttle information at the speed of light in quantum computers and other high-speed electronic devices.

Posted: Feb 13th, 2013

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The role of carbon nanomaterials in catalysis

A new review looks at the effects of the orientation of a graphene sheet, the edge structure of carbon nanofibers, and different surface functional groups on proton affinity, interactions with metal nanoparticles, and electronic modification of these structures, together with their catalytic consequences.

Posted: Feb 13th, 2013

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