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Researchers lay groundwork for cell version of DNA chip

A new technique in which single strands of synthetic DNA are used to firmly fasten biological cells to non-biological surfaces has been developed by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California at Berkeley. This technique holds promise for a wide variety of applications, including biosensors, drug-screening technologies, the growing of artificial tissues and the design of neural networks.

Posted: Feb 6th, 2006

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New carbon nanotube pilot plant in France

On January 30, 2006 Arkema inaugurated a carbon nanotube pilot plant at its Lacq Research Center in the Aquitaine region of France. With this unique pilot plant in Europe, operating a patented catalysis process, Arkema is now in a position to produce carbon nanotubes in semi-industrial quantities (up to 10 tonnes per year).

Posted: Feb 3rd, 2006

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New design for transistors powered by single electrons

Scientists have demonstrated the first reproducible, controllable silicon transistors that are turned on and off by the motion of individual electrons. The experimental devices may have applications in low-power nanoelectronics, particularly as next-generation integrated circuits for logic operations.

Posted: Feb 3rd, 2006

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Monitoring blood cholesterol with MWNTs

Researchers at the Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department at Florida International University in Miami developed a novel type of working electrode consisting of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes on a silicon platform. The suggested silicon based CNT working electrode can potentially be integrated with signal processing circuitry and can be part of lab-on-a-chip systems.

Posted: Feb 2nd, 2006

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U.S. regulatory framework for Nanotechnology?

In January 2006, the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars released a report by one of the foremost authorities on environmental research and policy, which examines the strengths and weaknesses of the current regulatory framework for nanotechnology and calls for a new approach to nanotechnology oversight.

Posted: Feb 2nd, 2006

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Nanoparticles Improve Biodistribution of Promising Anticancer Therapy

Indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA-approved dye used in a variety of diagnostic applications, has shown promise as a light-activated anticancer agent, but the human body eliminates this molecule so rapidly that little of it accumulates in tumors. To solve this problem, a group of investigators at St. Johns University in New York have created a polymeric nanoparticle formulation of ICG that appears to increase dramatically the amount of dye that remains in the body long enough to accumulate in tissues.

Posted: Feb 1st, 2006

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Novel nanotube positioning technique paves the way for integration into mass produced devices

Researchers at UC Berkeley, led by Prof. Alex Zettl, have developed a combination of novel room temperature methods for both aligning and selectively depositing nanotubes onto a topologically benign surface. Using these methods, which can easily be integrated into semiconductor manufacturing processes, they have fabricated arrays of aligned torsional NEMS devices based on MWCNTs.

Posted: Jan 31st, 2006

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New discovery gives insight into guided self-assembly

Princeton researchers have untangled the mystery behind a puzzling phenomenon first observed more than a decade ago in the ultra-small world of nanotechnology. Why is it, researchers wondered, that tiny aggregates of soap molecules, known as surfactant micelles, congregate as long, low arches resembling Quonset huts once they are placed on a graphite surface?

Posted: Jan 30th, 2006

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From 2D blueprint, material assembles into novel 3D nanostructures

An international team of scientists affiliated with the UW-Madison Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center has coaxed a self-assembling material into forming never-before-seen, three-dimensional nanoscale structures, with potential applications ranging from catalysis and chemical separation to semiconductor manufacturing.

Posted: Jan 27th, 2006

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Nanofactories: Glimpsing the future of process technology

A special report titled "Nanofactories: Glimpsing the future of process technology" is the cover article for the January 2006 issue of CleanRooms Magazine. The lengthy article, subtitled "Making sense of the molecular machine shop," concludes that, while the promise of medical nanorobotics and nanoscale factories and their products is still far off, the principle of molecular manufacturing already has been demonstrated in the laboratory and the next step, nanoscale systems that make other nanoscale systems, currently has a strong theoretical foundation.

Posted: Jan 27th, 2006

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Mystery of metallic glass is cracked

Using state-of-the-art lab techniques and powerful computer simulations, Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered how atoms pack themselves in unusual materials known as metallic glasses. Their findings should help scientists better understand the atomic scale structure of this material, which is used to make sports equipment, cell phone cases, armor-piercing projectiles and other products.

Posted: Jan 26th, 2006

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