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Lungs may suffer when certain elements go nano

Scientists have been systematically studying the effects of transition metal oxide nanoparticles on human lung cells. These nanoparticles are used extensively in optical and recording devices, water purification systems, cosmetics and skin care products, and targeted drug delivery, among other applications.

Posted: Jan 28th, 2014

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Ausgerichtete DNA-Drähte für die Nanoelektronik

Da die anhaltende Miniaturisierung elektronischer Bauelemente bald an ihre physikalischen Grenzen stößt, suchen Forscher nach neuen Herstellungsmethoden. Einen aussichtsreichen Ansatz liefert DNA-Origami, bei dem sich Einzelstränge des Biomoleküls selbstständig zu beliebig geformten Nanostrukturen zusammenfinden.

Posted: Jan 28th, 2014

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Computing with silicon neurons

Scientists from Berlin and Heidelberg use artifical nerve cells to classify different types of data. Thus, they may recognize handwritten numbers, or distinguish plant species based on their flowers.

Posted: Jan 27th, 2014

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Ultra-tiny nanocomputer may point the way to further miniaturization in industry

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers from The MITRE Corporation and Harvard University have taken key steps toward ultra-small electronic computer systems that push beyond the imminent end of Moore's Law, which states that the device density and overall processing power for computers will double every two to three years.

Posted: Jan 27th, 2014

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Swiss cheese crystal, or high-tech sponge?

The sponges of the future will do more than clean house. Delivering drugs and trapping gases are all potential applications. That's what chemist Jason Benedict had in mind when he led the design of a new, porous material whose pores change shape in response to ultraviolet light.

Posted: Jan 27th, 2014

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Bacterial spores as building blocks for nanogenerators (w/video)

A new type of electrical generator uses bacterial spores to harness the untapped power of evaporating water, according to research conducted at the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University. Its developers foresee electrical generators driven by changes in humidity from sun-warmed ponds and harbors.

Posted: Jan 27th, 2014

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