Nanotechnology Research – Universities

 

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The Stupp laboratory at Northwestern University
The group harnesses molecular recognition and self-assembly processes in template-directed protocols for the synthesis of functionalized and mechanized molecules, prior to their being introduced into integrated nanosystems.
The 5-year programme is supported on a solid foundation of courses within physics, chemistry and mathematics. These are combined with courses in electronics and materials science that are oriented towards technology to give a good grounding for further studies in nanotechnology. The programme provides the theoretical basis and knowledge of experimental methods and technological applications of nanotechnology. The social implications of nanotechnology pertaining to ethical and environmental issues are also addressed. The first two years are common for all students in the programme. In the last three years, students choose their main profile from key areas relating to research, business and industry.
The aim of NTNU NanoLab is to establish a cross-disciplinary research environment for researchers within the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, electrical engineering, materials technology and medical research.
The convergence of multiple disciplines creates a synergy capable of overcoming persistent barriers and filling knowledge gaps to allow for transformational, revolutionary, and embryonic opportunities with many technological applications. The Institute's tools and research methodologies include in-depth analysis using convergence of multi/trans-disciplinary S&T fields, focused on nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, cognitive sciences, artificial intelligence, robotics, and genetics.
EMNLAB is a group within the physical electronics branch of Electrical Engineering at The Ohio State University. The group focuses on using a wide array of analysis, processing, and growth techniques to investigate the surface, interface, and ultrathin film properties of semiconductors.
A fundamental question to be addressed in the group's research is how we can learn from biological systems in nature, especially at the micro/nano-scale, in order to engineer biocompatible nanomaterials and further develop innovative robotic systems that are capable of interfacing with molecular and cellular systems for advanced therapeutics and tissue engineering applications, and for swimming efficiently in fluidic environment.
The goal of the center is to create devices that will make diagnosing, treating and managing diseases easier, less expensive and more effective.
The group's research is focused on the computational analysis of the flow, heat and mass transfer in micro and nano fluidic systerms. Current research projects include modeling of an implantable artifical kidney, DNA translocation in nanopores and fundamental issues associated with bio-sensing.
A major nanoprobe laboratory with a focus on bio/nanotechnology and biomimetics was organized in July 1991 with the initial financial support from the state of Ohio and The Ohio State University. More than 5700 square feet of laboratory space was made available for this purpose. The laboratory is populated with the modern scientific equipment needed to conduct state-of-the-art research.
ENCOMM NanoSystems Laboratory is operated by the OSU Center for Electronic and Magnetic Nanoscale Composite Multifunctional Materials. Its goal is to provide academic and industrial users with access to advanced material characterization and fabrication tools for research and development applications.
The center facility for nanotech research at Ohio State.
Atomistic Construction of Nanostructures and Nanoscale Devices
Nanoscale research at Ohio University's Department of Physics.
Der Studiengang vermittelt Kenntnisse und Fähigkeiten in der Herstellung, Prüfung, Verarbeitung und Verwendung von Werkstoffen, z.B. von Metallen, Kunststoffen, Nichtmetallisch-Anorganischen Werkstoffen und Werkstoffen der Verbund- und Nanotechnologie.
The group combines experiments, theory, and modeling to explore the dynamics and properties of flows involving nano- or micro-structures (i.e., DNA, surfactants, lipid vesicles, or bacteria, cells), in which intermolecular/particle forces give rise to time- and length-scale distributions that are important in many biophysical and technological processes.
This research unit studies the structural, magnetic, electronic, chemical properties and applications of size selected monometallic, bimetallic and core?shell nanoclusters/nanoparticles prepared by magnetron sputter gas aggregation source.
The central theme of the group's research program is the development and application of cutting-edge bio- and nano- technologies and ultrasensitive analytical methodologies to address fundamental and practical questions in chemical, biochemical and biomedical research.
Research in Prof. Xu's group is directed toward the integration of 'Nano', 'Bio', and 'Chem' at femtoliter, attoliter, and single molecule scales through nanofluidics. They continue to involve the study and development of novel nanofluidic methods and devices for single cell omics, single molecule chemistry, biomaterials, nanomedicine, energy, and process engineering.
Ultra high spatial-resolution and sensitivity for sensing biomolecules and DNA can be achieved by the use of nanotechnology such as scanning probe techniques and non-linear photonics using ultra short pulsed lasers. The Group is evolving these techniques to create new biological applications, particularly, real-time measurement of the chemical reactions occurring in living cells and tissue.
The Institute for NanoScience Design prepares various kinds of education and training programs such as trans-disciplinary graduate-school minor program, evening course refresher program, short-term international research training program, etc. It offers a series of lectures, some of them in the form of distance education broadcasted live to satellite classrooms located many places in Japan, and tentatively even overseas in English.
LaSIE is doing some of the world's frontier research in photonics, nanotechnology (nanophotonics, nanofabrication), and bio-related areas.
The Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center proactively promotes industrial applications of nanotechnology while carrying out bottom-up and top-down technologies.
The Protonic NanoMachine Group aims at the ultimate understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and its regulation, conformational switching, force generation, and energy transduction by biological macromolecular complexes.
Research in the group focuses mainly on molecular signaling systems that transmit and convert cell and gene information, in which dynamic organization into the bio-system is deeply related to the function. Techniques including imaging technique of single molecules in 3D and real time aer being developed to visualize and manipulate single molecules in bio-systems and the behavior, structural changes and physical and chemical properties of individual bio-molecules acting in bio-molecular systems will be monitored in real time and space.
 
 
 
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