Nanotechnology Research – Universities

 

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The group has broad interests in the interaction of optical, electric, and magnetic fields with matter at small length scales. They work on new 3-D fabrication methods, self-assembly, actuation, and propulsion. They have observed a number of fundamental effects and are developing new experimental techniques and instruments.
The focus of our research is to synthesize molecules whose ability to selectively recognize biomolecular targets is improved over that of unmodified biomolecules and to employ this capability to develop new functional entities. The molecular recognition phenomena of interest include the recognition of transition states, i.e. the generation of new biomimetic catalysts.
The Advanced Technology Institute is an interdisciplinary research centre dedicated to advancing next-generation electronic and photonic device technologies.
Electronic Engineering with Nanotechnology offers engineers a firm grounding in conventional electronics, plus the specialist skills at the electronics/physics interface required to work at the forefront of modern nanoscale device fabrication. These programmes enable you to build on a common foundation in electronics by introducing specialist modules from the second year. These modules cover nanoscale electronic devices, optoelectronics, nanofabrication and advanced experimental methods.
The programme's broad theme is the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology. The programme covers the fundamentals behind nanotechnology and moves on to discuss its implementation using nanomaterials - such as graphene - and the use of advanced tools of nanotechnology which allow us to see at the nanoscale, before discussing future trends and applications for energy generation and storage.
Research within the group can be broken largely into four themes; Nanotechnology (STM, FIB), Nanobiology, Carbon Based Electronics, Microwave Electronics and Devices and Large Area Electronics and Photonics.
The university's Institute for Nanoscale Technology has two major research programs, applying Nanotechnology to the areas of Biomedical Nano-materials and Devices and to Energy Efficient Nano-materials and Devices.
The group's research enables nanodevices and integrated systems with ultralow energy consumption, minimising all the parasitic energy (electrical, thermal, mechanical) losses which make devices power-hungry and less performant. Low energy consumption needs to be complemented with efficient energy storage and an appropriate system design. Nanomaterials like graphene and novel 2D materials are key enablers.
The group's mission is to develop novel semiconductor materials and devices to address a few issues facing today's semiconductor industry, and more generally, our society. Research focuses on semiconductor surfaces, interfaces, and thin films.
Research at the lab involves the fabrication, characterization and applications of novel magnetic nanostructures, including multilayer films, nanorods, nanodisks and nanotubes.
Nano-Bio-Physics is a new and interdisciplinary program being developed at UTA Physics department. The goal is to develop a strong research and education program among nanotechnology, biotechnology and Physics.
The Nanotechnology Research & Teaching Facility is an interdisciplinary resource open to scientists within and outside of the University. Research activities are conducted through mutually-beneficial associations of chemistry, electrical engineering, mechanical and aerospace engineering, materials science and physics faculty, graduate students and research assistants at UTA, as well as collaborative efforts with investigators at other universities and in the private sector.
The University of Texas at Arlington is home to the preeminent university-based nanotechnology research, development and teaching facility in North Texas.
Research activities in the lab are concerned with basic and applied processing-structure-property relationship with emphasis on nanotechnology and small-scale materials (nano materials, surface treatments and layers, thin films, coatings, materials for MEMS and NEMS and nano devices).
Research activities at the lab are concerned with basic and applied processing-structure-property relationship with emphasis on nanotechnology and small-scale materials (nano materials, surface treatments and layers, thin films, coatings, materials for MEMS and NEMS and nano devices).
The Center for Nano- and Molecular Science and Technology (CNM), founded in October 2000, is a multidisciplinary research center within the Texas Materials Institute (TMI). The Center's mission is to foster research, education, and outreach in nanotechnology at the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin).
The group's esearch interests span over a broad range of technical areas, including applied electromagnetics, nano-optics and nanophotonics, microwave, THz, infrared, optical and acoustic metamaterials and metasurfaces, plasmonics, nonlinearities and nonreciprocity, cloaking and scattering, acoustics, optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas.
A member of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN).
The group is exploring the growth and electronic properties of quantum confined systems, such as semiconductor nanowires and graphene, for novel high speed, low power electronic devices. They are interested in band engineered Ge-SiGe core-shell nanowires and field-effect transistors, spin transport in germanium nanowires, and the electronic properties of graphene bilayers.
Prof. Fan's research program focuses on manufacturing, manipulation, robotization, and assembly of micro/nanostructured materials via understanding and exploiting fundamental materials science, physics, and chemistry. The applications include micro/nanorobotics, stimulus responsive devices, biochemical sensing, single-cell biocue delivery, flexible three-dimensional (3D) porous catalyts, solar steaming for water treatment, and self-powered systems.
The lab's research is focused on the design and implementation of processes and equipment to manufacture nanoscale materials and devices. The focus is on three areas: 1) develop new assembly methods to better integrate nanomaterials into micro/macroscale devices; 2) increase manufacturability of nanoscale systems through improved device design; and 3) improve quality and throughput of nanoscale device manufacturing through the design and fabrication of novel nanomanufacturing equipment and processes.
The lab's research focuses on exploring and exploiting nanomaterials/structures in biomedical applications. A main interest lies in applying advanced nanoelectronic devices to various neural systems.
The Ruoff group is located in the department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas. Major interests are: Synthesis and properties of nanostructures including CNTs and graphene; Energy and the Environment; Preparation and properties of composites; Nanomanipulation and nanorobotics; Instrument development and technology transition; New tools and methods for the biomedical sciences.
SWAN is one of the three centers created in 2006 by the Semiconductor Research Corporation Nanoelectronics Research Initiative ( SRC-NRI) to find a replacement to conventional metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. SRC-NRI is a consortium of TI, Freescale, AMD, MICRON, Intel and IBM.
Director of the NanoTech Institute of the University of Texas at Dallas.