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The latest news about environmental and green
technologies – renewables, energy savings, fuel cells

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The next 'black gold' could be green

Recent decades have witnessed several cycles of interest in being able to exploit these organisms. Research has examined the use of algae for remediating waste water or nutrient-overloaded coastal seas, absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or directly from industrial chimneys, in beneficial products such as proteins and antioxidants, and to produce oil and liquid fuels. Given its indisputable virtues, why has microalgae not been put to use in these ways?

Posted: Aug 27th, 2013

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ManuCloud: Integrating the solar cell supply chain online

The EU-funded MANUCLOUD (Distributed Cloud product specification and supply chain manufacturing execution infrastructure) project, which was completed in July 2013, sought to boost European competitiveness by establishing a functioning online marketplace that would benefit manufacturers, suppliers and customers.

Posted: Aug 23rd, 2013

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Identifying climate impact hotspots across sectors

One out of ten people on Earth is likely to live in a climate impact hotspot by the end of this century, if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated. Many more are put at risk in a worst-case scenario of the combined impacts on crop yields, water availability, ecosystems, and health, according to a new study.

Posted: Aug 15th, 2013

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Electrochemical step towards a better hydrogen storage

Good metal-based systems for hydrogen storage cannot be developed without knowing how this element permeates through metals. Researchers at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw managed to apply a user-friendly electrochemical method to study hydrogen diffusion in highly reactive metals.

Posted: Aug 14th, 2013

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The changing shape of solar

Researchers develop one of the first combined solar/thermal energy generators. It can suck up the heat of a hot summer's day and turn it into electricity.

Posted: Aug 13th, 2013

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