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The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Laser with controlled polarization opens door to wide range of applications

Applied scientists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) in collaboration with researchers from Hamamatsu Photonics in Hamamatsu City, Japan, have demonstrated, for the first time, lasers in which the direction of oscillation of the emitted radiation, known as polarization, can be designed and controlled at will.

Posted: Apr 12th, 2009

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Tracking down the effect of nanoparticles

Cerium oxide is a ceramic nano-abrasive. Scientists have now examined, under conditions close to reality, what happens when it is breathed in and deposited on the lung surface. Initially, the result was rather reassuring.

Posted: Apr 12th, 2009

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Germany's version of MIT established

With last month's passing of the bill for the 'Act on the KIT Merger', the cabinet of the state of Baden-Wuerttemberg has set the course for the legislation procedure to establish the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).

Posted: Apr 12th, 2009

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The $5000 nanotechnology cycling suit for gentlemen

This news comes with perfect timing for your bike excursion plans on a sunny Easter weekend: Textile company Rapha have unveiled a bespoke three-piece cycling suit in London last night. Price tag: a bit over $5000.

Posted: Apr 11th, 2009

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Leading-edge data analytics and visualization enable breakthrough science

Most science research programs that run on high-performance computers like the IBM Blue Gene/P Intrepid at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) generate enormous quantities of data that represent the results of their calculations. But scientists can also use the ALCF to visualize, explore and communicate their findings as highly accurate simulations and often beautiful images.

Posted: Apr 10th, 2009

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New method could lead to narrower chip patterns

Researchers at MIT have found a novel method for etching extremely narrow lines on a microchip, using a material that can be switched from transparent to opaque, and vice versa, just by exposing it to certain wavelengths of light.

Posted: Apr 10th, 2009

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