Introduction to Nanotechnology

Our comprehensive introduction to nanotechnology and nanoscience
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Carbon Nanotubes 101

The intent of this section is to convey a general understanding of what carbon nanotubes are, how they are produced, their many unique and interesting properties, markets, and applications.
For starters, you could watch these five short videos about carbon nanotubes:
In 1980 we knew of only three forms of carbon, namely diamond, graphite, and amorphous carbon. Today we know there is a whole family of other forms of carbon. The first to be discovered was the hollow, cage-like buckminsterfullerene molecule - also known as the buckyball, or the C60 fullerene. There are now thirty or more forms of fullerenes, and also an extended family of linear molecules, carbon nanotubes. C60 is the first spherical carbon molecule, with carbon atoms arranged in a soccer ball shape. In the structure there are 60 carbon atoms and a number of five-membered rings isolated by six-membered rings. The second, slightly elongated, spherical carbon molecule in the same group resembles a rugby ball, has seventy carbon atoms and is known as C70. C70ís structure has extra six-membered carbon rings, but there are also a large number of other potential structures containing the same number of carbon atoms. Their particular shapes depend on whether five-membered rings are isolated or not, or whether seven-membered rings are present. Many other forms of fullerenes up to and beyond C120 have been characterized, and it is possible to make other fullerene structures with five-membered rings in different positions and sometimes adjoining one another.
The important fact for nanotechnology is that useful dopant atoms can be placed inside the hollow fullerene ball. Atoms contained within the fullerene are said to be endohedral. Of course they can also be bonded to fullerenes outside the ball as salts, if the fullerene can gain electrons.
Endohedral fullerenes can be produced in which metal atoms are captured within the fullerene cages. Theory shows that the maximum electrical conductivity is to be expected for endohedral metal atoms, which will transfer three electrons to the fullerene. Fullerenes can be dispersed on the surface as a monolayer. That is, there is only one layer of molecules, and they are said to be mono dispersed. Provided fullerenes can be placed in very specific locations, they may be aligned to form a fullerene wire. Systems with appropriate material inside the fullerene ball are conducting and are of particular interest because they can be deposited to produce bead-like conducting circuits. Combining endohedrally doped structures with non-doped structures changes the actual composition of a fullerene wire, so that it may be tailored in-situ during patterning. Hence within a single wire, insulating and conducting regions may be precisely defined. One-dimensional junction engineering becomes realistic with fullerenes.
Possibly more important than fullerenes are carbon nanotubes, which are related to graphite. The molecular structure of graphite resembles stacked, one-atom-thick sheets of chicken wire - a planar network of interconnected hexagonal rings of carbon atoms. In conventional graphite, the sheets of carbon are stacked on top of one another, allowing them to easily slide over each other. That is why graphite is not hard, but it feels greasy, and can be used as a lubricant. When graphene sheets are rolled into a cylinder and their edges joined, they form CNTs. Only the tangents of the graphitic planes come into contact with each other, and hence their properties are more like those of a molecule.
CNTs come in a variety of diameters, lengths, and functional group content. CNTs today are available for industrial applications in bulk quantities of metric ton quantities. Several CNT manufacturers have >100 ton per year production capacity for multi walled nanotubes.
A nanotube may consist of one tube of graphite, a one-atom thick single-wall nanotube, or a number of concentric tubes called multiwalled nanotubes. When viewed with a transmission electron microscope these tubes appear as planes. Whereas single walled nanotubes appear as two planes, in multi walled nanotubes more than two planes are observed, and can be seen as a series of parallel lines. There are different types of CNTs, because the graphitic sheets can be rolled in different ways. The three types of CNTs are Zigzag, Armchair, and Chiral. It is possible to recognize zigzag, armchair, and chiral CNTs just by following the pattern across the diameter of the tubes, and analyzing their cross-sectional structure.
Multi walled nanotubes can come in an even more complex array of forms, because each concentric single-walled nanotube can have different structures, and hence there are a variety of sequential arrangements. The simplest sequence is when concentric layers are identical but different in diameter. However, mixed variants are possible, consisting of two or more types of concentric CNTs arranged in different orders. These can have either regular layering or random layering. The structure of the nanotube influences its properties - including electrical and thermal conductivity, density, and lattice structure. Both type and diameter are important. The wider the diameter of the nanotube, the more it behaves like graphite. The narrower the diameter of the nanotube, the more its intrinsic properties depends upon its specific type.
 
 
 
 
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