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The latest news about environmental and green
technologies – renewables, energy savings, fuel cells

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Developing heat tolerant crops

With heatwaves predicted to increase in intensity and duration, the importance of heat tolerant crops is becoming increasingly urgent.

Posted: Jan 10th, 2013

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NASA chases climate change clues into the stratosphere

Starting this month, NASA will send a remotely piloted research aircraft as high as 65,000 feet over the tropical Pacific Ocean to probe unexplored regions of the upper atmosphere for answers to how a warming climate is changing Earth.

Posted: Jan 10th, 2013

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Mathematics and weather and climate research

How does mathematics improve our understanding of weather and climate? Can mathematicians determine whether an extreme meteorological event is an anomaly or part of a general trend? Presentations touching on these questions will be given at the annual national mathematics conference in San Diego, California.

Posted: Jan 9th, 2013

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Engineering alternative fuel with cyanobacteria

Sandia National Laboratories Truman Fellow Anne Ruffing has engineered two strains of cyanobacteria to produce free fatty acids, a precursor to liquid fuels, but she has also found that the process cuts the bacteria's production potential.

Posted: Jan 7th, 2013

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A French nuclear exit?

France has been held up, worldwide, as the forerunner in using nuclear fission to produce electricity. However, a third of the nation's nuclear reactors will need replacing in the next decade, and public opinion has shifted toward reducing reliance on nuclear power.

Posted: Jan 7th, 2013

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Wine feels the effects of a changing climate

The signs of climate change are universally evident, but for French winemakers, already feeling the effects of competition from other countries, the year of volatile weather does not bode well.

Posted: Jan 7th, 2013

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From the Amazon rainforest to human body cells: quantifying stability

The Amazon rainforest, energy grids, and cells in the human body share a troublesome property: they possess multiple stable states. When the world's largest tropical forest suddenly starts retreating in a warming climate, energy supply blacks out, or cells turn carcinogenic, complex-systems science understands this as a transition between two such states.

Posted: Jan 7th, 2013

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Sacrifice and luck help Japan survive without nuclear power

In the wake of the Fukushima disaster, nuclear-dependent Japan began shutting down its other reactors. Toshiya Okamura, a Tokyo Gas executive and visiting scholar at Stanford University, explains how the country survived the summer, and expresses deep concerns about this winter and his country's energy future.

Posted: Jan 7th, 2013

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DOE awards $10M to develop advanced biofuels

These projects use innovative synthetic biological and chemical techniques to convert biomass into processable sugars that can be transformed into bioproducts and drop-in biofuels for cars, trucks, and planes.

Posted: Jan 5th, 2013

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