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Nanomedicine: Germ killers

Polymer-based nanostructures that can selectively burst open bacteria show promise for tackling drug-resistant microbes.

Posted: Nov 23rd, 2011

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Nanotribology: Tubular probes

Short, capped single-walled carbon nanotubes may serve as ideal probing tips to study friction, lubrication and wear at the microscale.

Posted: Nov 23rd, 2011

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Nanowrinkles, nanofolds yield strange hidden channels

In a series of observations and experiments, engineers at Brown University and in Korea have discovered unusual properties in wrinkles and folds at the nanoscale. The researchers report that wrinkles created on super-thin films have hidden long waves that lengthen even when the film is compressed. The team also discovered that when folds are formed in such films, closed nanochannels appear below the surface, like thousands of super-tiny pipes.

Posted: Nov 23rd, 2011

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Blocked holes can enhance rather than stop light going through

Conventional wisdom would say that blocking a hole would prevent light from going through it, but Princeton University engineers have discovered the opposite to be true. A research team has found that placing a metal cap over a small hole in a metal film does not stop the light at all, but rather enhances its transmission.

Posted: Nov 22nd, 2011

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UCSB professor receives award for graphene electronics research

Professor Kaustav Banerjee, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and Director of the Nanoelectronics Research Lab at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has been named winner of the 2011 international research award by the Electrostatic Discharge Association (ESDA).

Posted: Nov 22nd, 2011

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Materials scientists watch electrons "melt"

When a skier rushes down a ski slope or a skater glides across an ice rink, a very thin melted layer of liquid water forms on the surface of the ice crystals, which allows for a smooth glide instead of a rough skid. In a recent experiment, scientists have discovered that the interface between the surface and bulk electronic structures of certain crystalline materials can act in much the same way.

Posted: Nov 22nd, 2011

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