Nanotechnology News – Latest Headlines

Tandem catalysis in nanocrystal interfaces: Could be a boon to green energy

In a development that holds intriguing possibilities for the future of industrial catalysis, as well as for such promising clean green energy technologies as artificial photosynthesis, researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have created bilayered nanocrystals of ametal-metal oxide that are the first to feature multiple catalytic sites on nanocrystal interfaces. These multiple catalytic sites allow for multiple, sequential catalytic reactions to be carried out selectively and in tandem.

Apr 11th, 2011

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Caught red-handed - Detection of latent fingerprints through release of fluorescein from a nanofiber mat

When a forensic agent dusts a surface with powder or exposes it to the vapors of an iodine chamber, mystery fans know what is going on: This is how latent fingerprints are made visible so that they can be compared to those of a suspect. Scientists have now developed a new process for especially rapid and simple detection of fingerprints. All it takes is a special nanofiber mat that is pressed onto the suspect surface and briefly treated with hot air - the fingerprints appear as red ridge patterns.

Apr 11th, 2011

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Solarstrom auf die Spitze getrieben

Kuenftig laesst sich vielleicht schon mit einer einzigen Solarzelle etwas anfangen. Forscher des Max-Planck-Instituts fuer Mikrostrukturphysik haben naemlich einen Effekt entdeckt, aufgrund dessen ein fotovoltaisches Element aus Bismutferrit eine Spannung von bis zu 40 Volt und nennenswerte Stromdichten liefert.

Apr 11th, 2011

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New method for self-assembling molecules

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have discovered a new way of making small molecules self-assemble into complex nanopatterns, which will push the limits of what is possible in 'bottom-up' methods of nanopatterning for advanced functional materials through molecular self-assembly.

Apr 11th, 2011

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Nanotechnology researchers find replacement for rare material indium tin oxide

Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have developed a replacement for indium tin oxide (ITO), an important material used in displays for all kinds of everyday products such as TVs, telephones and laptops, as well as in solar cells. Unfortunately indium is a rare metal, and the available supplies are expected to be virtually exhausted within as little as ten years. The replacement material is a transparent, conducting film produced in water, and based on electrically conducting carbon nanotubes and plastic nanoparticles. It is made of commonly available materials, and on top of that is also environment-friendly.

Apr 11th, 2011

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Nanotechnology keeps the shine on silver (w/video)

Using a special reactor inside a clean room, researchers apply nanometer thick films of aluminum oxide to a sample silver wafer about the size of a silver dollar. The films conform to the recesses and protrusions of the silver, creating a protective barrier.

Apr 11th, 2011

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NanoCode publishes synthesis report of stakeholder survey on EU Code of Conduct

The NanoCode Synthesis Report on its Stakeholder CoC Survey (pdf) provides the findings of the international, quantitative and qualitative NanoCode survey about the European Code of Conduct for Responsible Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies Research (EU-CoC). The results summarised in this report give insights into stakeholder's patterns of awareness, their expectations, attitudes and appraisals. The survey analyses the degree of compliance and commitment, identifies recommendations for the communication, possible incentives, disincentives and monitoring of the EU-CoC.

Apr 11th, 2011

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The magnetism - and mystery - of superconductors

Exactly 100 years ago today, physicist Kamerlingh Onnes cooled mercury to 4.2 degrees Kelvin, or -450 Fahrenheit, and discovered that it conducted an electric current perfectly - no electricity was lost as heat or friction. This phenomenon is called superconductivity.

Apr 8th, 2011

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Johns Hopkins Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center (CNTC) launched

To train new scientists and engineers to combat the spread of cancer, Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) has established a pre-doctoral (PhD) training program in Nanotechnology for Cancer Medicine. Together with the institute's previously established Nanotechnology for Cancer Medicine postdoctoral fellowship, these two training programs will comprise the Johns Hopkins Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center (CNTC).

Apr 8th, 2011

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