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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Scientists demonstrate breakthrough thermal material system to enable faster computing

Scientists in GE's Global Research Center have demonstrated an advanced thermal material system that could pave the way to faster computing and higher performing electronic systems. Leveraging technologies developed under GE's Nanotechnology Advanced Technology Program, they have fabricated a prototype substrate that can cool electronic devices such as a laptop computer twice as well as copper.

Posted: Mar 15th, 2011

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UAlbany NanoCollege to host expanded Business Plan Competition for students

Expanding eligibility to college students from across the state, while offering additional categories and enhanced cash prizes, the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) of the University at Albany, in partnership with UAlbany's School of Business, the Lally School of Management and Technology at Rensselaer, and Union Graduate College School of Management today announced plans for the second annual New York State Business Plan Competition, to be held Thursday, April 28 at the UAlbany NanoCollege.

Posted: Mar 15th, 2011

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Using light to assemble nanoparticles into superstructures

Scientists in the Center for Nanoscale Materials and Argonne's Biosciences Division have demonstrated a remarkably simple, elegant, and cost-effective way of assembling nanoparticles into larger structures of any desired shape and form at will via a process called "optically directed assembly".

Posted: Mar 15th, 2011

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Fundamental discovery could lead to better memory chips

Engineering researchers at the University of Michigan have found a way to improve the performance of ferroelectric materials, which have the potential to make memory devices with more storage capacity than magnetic hard drives and faster write speed and longer lifetimes than flash memory.

Posted: Mar 15th, 2011

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Silicon spin transistors heat up and spins last longer

University of Utah researchers built "spintronic" transistors and used them to align the magnetic "spins" of electrons for a record period of time in silicon chips at room temperature. The study is a step toward computers, phones and other spintronic devices that are faster and use less energy than their electronic counterparts.

Posted: Mar 15th, 2011

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New desalination process using carbon nanotubes

A faster, better and cheaper desalination process enhanced by carbon nanotubes has been developed by NJIT Professor Somenath Mitra. The process creates a unique new architecture for the membrane distillation process by immobilizing carbon nanotubes in the membrane pores. Conventional approaches to desalination are thermal distillation and reverse osmosis.

Posted: Mar 14th, 2011

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Nanorods could greatly improve visual display of information

Chemists at the University of California, Riverside have developed tiny, nanoscale-size rods of iron oxide particles in the lab that respond to an external magnetic field in a way that could dramatically improve how visual information is displayed in the future.

Posted: Mar 14th, 2011

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New techniques set stage for ultra-fast nanophotography

Processes at the atomic level are not only miniscule; they are often extremely fast and therefore, difficult to capture in action. But now, German scientists together with U.S. colleagues present techniques that take us a good step closer to producing an 'atomic movie'.

Posted: Mar 14th, 2011

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Cameras out of the salt shaker

There have been gloves and shavers for one-off use for a long time. In future, there will also be disposable endoscopes for minimally invasive operations on the human body. A new microcamera is what makes it possible. It is as large as a grain of salt, supplies razor-sharp pictures and can be manufactured very inexpensively.

Posted: Mar 14th, 2011

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Magnetic vortices on nanostructured thin-film for data storage

Magnetic vortices show promise as data storage structures, however the vortex formation process imposes a lower limit on the element's size. Here, a technique is presented, which application increases the probability of nucleating of magnetic vortices in sub-micrometer sized soft magnetic thin film elements.

Posted: Mar 14th, 2011

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Snapshots of laser driven electrons

Physicists of the Laboratory of Attosecond Physics at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics succeeded in the first real-time observation of laser produced electron plasma waves and electron bunches accelerated by them.

Posted: Mar 14th, 2011

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Book illuminates life, legacy of physicist Feynman

From childhood sweetheart to quantum electrodynamics, the life and scientific contributions of the legendary Richard Feynman, a physicist of mythic hero status, are given a new and stimulating perspective in a book by Arizona State University professor Lawrence M. Krauss.

Posted: Mar 14th, 2011

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