Open menu

Nanotechnology News – Latest Headlines

Playing snooker with atoms

Scientists speak of sputtering when energy-rich ions hit a solid object and cause atoms to be released from its surface. The phenomenon can be exploited to apply microscopically thin coatings to glass surfaces. A research team has developed a special sputtering technique that greatly increases the efficiency of the coating process.

Posted: Sep 1st, 2010

Read more

Atomares Billard-Spiel

Wenn energiereiche Ionen auf einen Festkoerper treffen und aus ihm Atome loesen, nennt man das Sputtern. Damit lassen sich Glasoberflaechen hauchduenn beschichten. Forscher haben ein spezielles Sputter-Verfahren entwickelt und die Beschichtungseffizienz enorm erhoeht. Von dem Ergebnis profitiert nicht nur die Architektur.

Posted: Sep 1st, 2010

Read more

Developments in nanobiotechnology at UCSB point to medical applications

Two new groundbreaking scientific papers by researchers at UC Santa Barbara demonstrate the synthesis of nanosize biological particles with the potential to fight cancer and other illnesses. The studies introduce new approaches that are considered 'green' nanobiotechnology because they use no artificial compounds.

Posted: Aug 31st, 2010

Read more

Washington Metro Region Nanotechnology Partnership Forum at NIST

On Sept. 13, 2010, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Federal Laboratory Consortium, the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) and the Montgomery County Department of Economic Development will co-sponsor a nanotechnology forum on NIST's Gaithersburg, Md., campus.

Posted: Aug 31st, 2010

Read more

Micro rheometer is latest lab-on-a-chip device

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a microminiaturized device that can make complex viscosity measurements - critical data for a wide variety of fields dealing with things that have to flow - on sample sizes as small as a few nanoliters.

Posted: Aug 31st, 2010

Read more

Silicon oxide nanoelectronics circuits break barrier

Rice University scientists have created the first two-terminal memory chips that use only silicon, one of the most common substances on the planet, in a way that should be easily adaptable to nanoelectronic manufacturing techniques and promises to extend the limits of miniaturization subject to Moore's Law.

Posted: Aug 31st, 2010

Read more

RSS Subscribe to our Nanotechnology Research News feed

Nanowerk on Facebook Engage with our Nanotechnology News on Facebook