Nanotechnology News – Latest Headlines

Voiding defects: New technique makes LED lighting more efficient

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are an increasingly popular technology for use in energy-efficient lighting. Researchers from North Carolina State University have now developed a new technique that reduces defects in the gallium nitride (GaN) films used to create LEDs, making them more efficient.

Jan 25th, 2011

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Shining new light on air pollutants using entangled porous frameworks

Certain types of pollution monitoring may soon become considerably easier. A group of researchers centered at Kyoto University has shown that a newly-formulated entangled framework of porous crystals (porous coordination polymers, or PCPs) can not only capture a variety of common air pollutants, but that the mixtures then glow in specific, easily-detected colors.

Jan 25th, 2011

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Imec launches new research program on high-bandwidth optical I/O

Imec announces the launch of a new industrial affiliation program on high-bandwidth optical input/output (I/O). The primary objective of the new program, which is part of imec's research platform on deep-submicron CMOS scaling, is to explore the use of optical solutions for realizing high-bandwidth I/O between CMOS chips.

Jan 25th, 2011

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The practical full-spectrum solar cell comes closer

Although full-spectrum solar cells have been made, none yet have been suitable for manufacture at a consumer-friendly price. Now Wladek Walukiewicz, who leads the Solar Energy Materials Research Group in the Materials Sciences Division (MSD) at Berkeley Lab, and his colleagues have demonstrated a solar cell that not only responds to virtually the entire solar spectrum, it can also readily be made using one of the semiconductor industry's most common manufacturing techniques.

Jan 25th, 2011

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GRIN plasmonics: A practical path to superfast computing, ultrapowerful optical microscopy and invisibility carpet-cloaking devices

They said it could be done and now they've done it. What's more, they did it with a GRIN. A team of researchers have carried out the first experimental demonstration of GRIN - for gradient index - plasmonics, a hybrid technology that opens the door to a wide range of exotic optics, including superfast computers based on light rather than electronic signals, ultra-powerful optical microscopes able to resolve DNA molecules with visible light, and 'invisibility' carpet-cloaking devices.

Jan 24th, 2011

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Plasmonic metamaterials: From microscopes to invisibility cloaks

A new class of artificial materials called metamaterials - which derive their properties from carefully engineered, nanostructured building blocks rather than from their chemical composition - may one day be used to create ultrapowerful microscopes, advanced sensors, improved solar cells, computers that use light instead of electronic signals to process information, and even an invisibility cloak.

Jan 24th, 2011

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New microscopy method opens window on previously unseen cell features

Nongjian Tao and his colleagues at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University have pioneered a new technique capable of peering into single cells and even intracellular processes with unprecedented clarity. The method, known as electrochemical impedance microscopy (EIM) may be used to explore subtle features of profound importance for basic and applied research, including cell adhesion, cell death (or apoptosis) and electroporation - a process that can be used to introduce DNA or drugs into cells.

Jan 24th, 2011

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Intelligent microscopy

Scientists at European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Heidelberg created new software that rapidly learns what researchers are looking for and automatically performs complex microscopy experiments.

Jan 24th, 2011

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Touchscreen aus Kohlenstoff

Fraunhofer-Forscher entwickeln ein alternatives Touchscreen Display aus erneuerbaren, preisguenstigen und weltweit verfuegbaren Rohstoffen. Auf der Messe nano tech in Tokio stellen die Stuttgarter Wissenschaftler vom 16. bis 18. Februar Touchscreens vor, die Carbon-Nanotubes enthalten.

Jan 24th, 2011

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Curved carbon for electronics of the future

A new scientific discovery could have profound implications for nanoelectronic components. Researchers from the Nano-Science Center at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, in collaboration with Japanese researchers, have shown how electrons on thin tubes of graphite exhibit a unique interaction between their motion and their attached magnetic field - the so-called spin.

Jan 23rd, 2011

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