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Showing Spotlights 1 - 8 of 33 in category Quantum Dots (newest first):

 

Wearable quantum dot display as electronic skin

QLED_displayNew work work shows the state of the art of engineering in wearable display technology. Researchers have demonstrated a passive matrix quantum dot light-emitting diode (QLED) display fully integrated with flexible electronics. They realized the visualization of meaningful information such as images, recorded healthcare data, and other messages using their display. This ultrathin and ultrasoft QLED array can be conformally laminated on human skin.

Posted: Aug 29th, 2017

Bubble-printed patterning of quantum dots on plasmonic substrates

quantum_dot_printingThe use of quantum dots (QDs) in practical applications relies on the ability to precisely pattern QDs on substrates with desired optical properties. Typical direct-write printing techniques such as inkjet and gravure printing are limited in resolution (micron-scale), structural complexity, and require significant post-processing time. In new work, researchers use laser-induced bubble printing to pattern CdSe/CdS QDs on plasmonic substrates with submicron resolution, high throughput, and strong QD-substrate adhesion.

Posted: May 11th, 2017

Inorganic perovskite quantum dots for lighting and displays

quantum_dotLuminescent quantum dots (LQDs), which possess high photoluminescence quantum yields, flexible emission color controlling, and solution processibility, are promising for applications in lighting systems (warm white light without UV and infrared irradiation) and high quality displays. However, the commercialization of LQDs has been held back by the prohibitively high cost of their production. In a breakthrough approach, researchers have now succeeded in preparing highly emissive inorganic perovskite quantum dots at room temperature.

Posted: Mar 7th, 2016

All-inorganic perovskite quantum dot display breaks Cd-barrier

quantum_dotEver since the first cadmium selenide quantum dot-based light-emitting devices (QLEDs) were reported in 1994, the dominant materials for QLEDs investigated since then have been limited to wurtzite or zinc blende Cd-based QDs. Similarly, the best developed and studied colloidal QD lasers have been fabricated from Cd-based semiconductors. Now, researchers have presented a new family of photoelectric materials for light-emitting devices: colloidal all-inorganic perovskite cesium lead halide QDs. This new material could find applications in LEDs and lasers, and has an especially big potential in high-performance displays, lighting, monochromatic narrow-band photodetectors, and optical communications.

Posted: Oct 22nd, 2015

Automated and scalable inline two-stage synthesis process for high quality colloidal quantum dots

quantum_dotsColloidal quantum dot nanocrystals are attractive materials for optoelectronics, sensing devices and third generation photovoltaics. Researchers have now developed an automated, scalable, in-line synthesis methodology of high-quality colloidal quantum dots based on a flow-reactor with two temperature-stages of narrow channel coils. The flow-reactor methodology not only enables easy scalability and cheap production, but also affords rapid screening of parameters, automation, and low reagent consumption during optimization.

Posted: Oct 28th, 2013

Solar paint paves the way for low-cost photovoltaics

solar_cellUsing quantum dots as the basis for solar cells is not a new idea, but attempts to make such devices have not yet achieved sufficiently high efficiency in converting sunlight to power. Although these performance levels are promising, all high-performing device results to date have relied on a multiple-layer-by-layer strategy for film fabrication rather than employing a single-layer deposition process. Now, though, researchers have developed a semiconductor ink with the goal of enabling the coating of large areas of solar cell substrates in a single deposition step and thereby eliminating tens of deposition steps necessary with the previous layer-by-layer method.

Posted: Aug 26th, 2013

Silicon LEDS are an alternative to toxic quantum dot LEDs

quantum_dotsQuantum dots are expected to deliver lower cost, higher energy efficiency and greater wavelength control for a wide range of products, including lamps, displays and photovoltaics. Unfortunately, the toxicity of the elements used for efficient quantum dot based LEDs is a severe drawback for many applications. Therefore, light-emitting devices which are based on the non-toxic element silicon are extraordinary promising candidates for future QD-lighting applications. Researchers have now demonstrated highly efficient and widely color-tunable silicon light-emitting diodes (SiLEDs). The emission wavelength of the devices can easily be tuned from the deep red (680 nm) down to the orange/yellow (625 nm) spectral region by simply changing the size of the used size-separated silicon nanocrystals.

Posted: Feb 8th, 2013

DNA reference tags allow single-molecule research on complex genomes

tagged_DNAKnowing the distribution of DNA binding proteins along the genome is very informative and can tell scientists about the state of gene expression at the time of measurement. These DNA-binding proteins include transcription factors which modulate the process of transcription, various polymerases, nucleases which cleave DNA molecules, and histones which are involved in chromosome packaging in the cell nucleus. Previously, researchers demonstrated the viability of a single-molecule approach to directly visualize and map protein binding sites on DNA using fluorescent quantum dots, allowing multicolor, nanometer-resolution localization. Now, they have shown that proteins bound to DNA can be located very accurately by direct imaging. The precision of these measurement presents new opportunities for contextual genomic research on the single-molecule level.

Posted: Mar 12th, 2012