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Nanotechnology Spotlight – Latest Articles

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Showing Spotlights 1 - 8 of 410 in category Bionanotechnology, Nanomedicine (newest first):

 

An alternative to antibiotics - weakening superbugs' grip

bacterial_infectionThe growing threat of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains may pose grave risks for society: A post-antibiotic era means, in effect, an end to modern medicine as we know it. New research findings could point the way to new treatments for now-invincible bacterial foes, not by developing a new antibiotic that would kill these bacteria, but by making them weaker so that they get more easily attacked by our immune system. Understanding the physical mechanisms that underlie this persistent stickiness at the molecular level is instrumental to combat these invaders.

Posted: Apr 20th, 2018

Nanotechnology takes steps towards artificial retinas

electronicSensory substitution with flexible electronics is one of the intriguing fields of research that takes place in nanotechnology labs around the world. In line with this focus on human senses, in the future artificial retinas integrated with the human body may not only repair damaged vision but also expand it to see a wider range wavelengths (e.g. ultraviolet light). Researchers now have demonstrated a new self-powered brain-linked vision electronic skin (e-skin) for mimicking the human retina. The general idea of our device design of brain-linked vision electronic skin is constructing an integrated flexible system including photodetector array, information analyzer, signal transmitter, and electricity power unit.

Posted: Apr 18th, 2018

Driving nanomotors through road blocks inside living cells

cell_insideResearchers demonstrate that helical shaped magnetic nanomotors can be maneuvered inside a living cell. This new and versatile technique has the potential ability to position any payload at any desired location inside a living cell itself, which is of great importance in the field of biology and biophysics. The helical shaped nanomotors are made of mainly silica and a thin layer of magnetic material, while their size is at least ten times smaller than the cell which they enter in. A rotating magnetic field is used to drive the motors inside the cytoplasm with precise control.

Posted: Apr 16th, 2018

Nanosilicates grow bone and cartilage tissue from stem cells in the absence of growth factors

stem_cellsResearchers have demonstrated that a specific type of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles, nanosilicates, can grow bone and cartilage tissue from stem cells in the absence of growth factors. These nanoparticles are similar in shape to a coin, but 10 billion times smaller in size. Nanosilicates consist of minerals such as sodium, silicate, magnesium and lithium, which are already present in the body. This avoids the use of growth factors in the human body, which can generate harmful effects including unwanted tissue growth, such as a tumor.

Posted: Apr 13th, 2018

Point-of-care biosensor for rapid and accurate sepsis diagnosis

diagnostic_systemSepsis is the body's extreme response to an infection. It is life-threatening condition in which bacteria or fungi multiply in a patient's blood - often too fast for antibiotics to help. Without timely treatment, sepsis can rapidly cause tissue damage, organ failure, and death. A critical unmet need in combating sepsis is the lack of accurate early biomarkers that can alert clinicians to a potential life-threatening situation and allow them to take preventative action. In a new study, researchers report the development of a point-of-care platform for rapid sepsis detection, called IBS (integrated biosensor for sepsis).

Posted: Apr 12th, 2018

Cell sex impacts the biological uptake of nanoparticles

actin_filamentsScientists have discovered that cell sex is an important overlooked factor at the nanobio interfaces. More specifically, depending on their sex, cells respond differently to the exact same type of nanoparticles. These findings have a capacity to optimize clinical translation of nanoparticles and also to help researchers to better design and produce safe and efficient therapeutic sex-specific nanoparticles. It is likely that there are other undiscovered differences that could influence nanoparticle uptake.

Posted: Mar 15th, 2018

Controlled release of nanohydrogel from halloysite nanotubes

nanohydrogelA popular structure for the development of nanodelivery systems are hollow tubular nanoparticles. In new work, researchers show that a hydrogel can be confined within the cavity of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) by means of an easy strategy. The alginate network inside the HNTs cavity can be triggered by chemical stimuli (by calcium chelators) altering the kinetics, which results in the release of the cargo. This shows that halloysite with tunable hydrophilic/hydrophobic interfaces can act as nanotemplate for the synthesis of drug delivery systems based on biopolymer hydrogels.

Posted: Mar 1st, 2018

Light-activated black phosphorus hydrogel releases cancer drugs

cancer_nanomedicineAs a new member of the two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial family, black phosphorus (BP) has attracted considerable attention in biomedicine, due to its unique physicochemical properties as well as excellent biocompatibility. Researchers have now demonstrated a novel concept of light activation of BP hydrogel to release drugs for cancer therapy. This BP hydrogel is comprised of BP nanosheets as a photosensitizer and hydrogel as a hydrophilic container for drugs. After injection, these nanosheets convert light to thermal energy when exposed to laser irradiation, leading to heating of the hydrogel matrix.

Posted: Feb 27th, 2018